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A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater

A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater

A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater
Oblique view of the structure from the north showing eroding edge of the peat platform. Credit: National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

The Maritime Archaeological Trust has discovered a new 8,000 year old structure next to what is believed to be the oldest boat building site in the world on the Isle of Wight.

Director of the Maritime Archaeological Trust, Garry Momber, said “This new discovery is particularly importantas the wooden platform is part of a site that doubles the amount of worked wood found in the UKfrom a period that lasted 5,500 years.”

The site lies east of Yarmouth, and the new platform is the most intact, wooden Middle Stone Age structure ever found in the UK. The site is now 11 meters below sea level and during the period there was human activity on the site, it was dry land with lush vegetation. Importantly, it was at a time before the North Sea was fully formed and the Isle of Wight was still connected to mainland Europe.

The site was first discovered in 2005 and contains an arrangement of trimmed timbers that could be platforms, walkways or collapsed structures. However, these were difficult to interpret until the Maritime Archaeological Trust used state of the art photogrammetry techniques to record the remains. During the late spring the new structure was spotted eroding from within the drowned forest. The first task was to create a 3-D digital model of the landscape so it could be experienced by non-divers. It was then excavated by the Maritime Archaeological Trust during the summer and has revealed a cohesive platform consisting of split timbers, several layers thick, resting on horizontally laid round-wood foundations.

Garry continued “The site contains a wealth of evidence for technological skills that were not thought to have been developed for a further couple of thousand years, such as advanced wood working. This site shows the value of marine archaeology for understanding the development of civilisation.

Yet, being underwater, there are no regulations that can protect it. Therefore, it is down to our charity, with the help of our donors, to save it before it is lost forever.”

A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater
3-D mosaic of structure during excavation. Credit: National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

The Maritime Archaeological Trust is working with the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) to record and study, reconstruct and display the collection of timbers. Many of the wooden artefacts are being stored in the British Ocean Sediment Core Research facility (BOSCORF), operated by the National Oceanography Centre.

As with sediment cores, ancient wood will degrademore quickly if it is not kept in a dark, wet and cold setting. While being kept cold, dark and wet, the aim is to remove salt from within wood cells of the timber, allowing it to be analysed andrecorded. This isimportant becausearchaeological information, such as cut marks or engravings, are most often found on the surface of the wood and are lost quickly when timber degrades.Once the timbers have been recorded and havedesalinated, the wood can be conserved for display.

Dr. Suzanne Maclachlan, the curator at BOSCORF, said “It has been really exciting for us to assist the Trust’s work with such unique and historically important artefacts. This is a great example of how the BOSCORF repository is able to support the delivery of a wide range of marine science.”

When diving on thesubmerged landscape Dan Snow, the history broadcaster and host of History Hit, one of the world’s biggest history podcasts, commented that he was both awestruck by the incredible remains and shocked by the rate of erosion.

This material, coupled with advanced working skills and finely crafted tools suggests a European, Neolithic (New Stone Age) influence. The problem is that it is all being lost. As the Solent evolves, sections of the ancient land surface are being eroded by up to half a metre per year and the is disappearing.

Research in 2019 was funded by the Scorpion Trust, the Butley Research Group, the Edward Fort Foundation and the Maritime Archaeology Trust. Work was conducted with the help of volunteers and many individuals who gave their time and often money, to ensure the material was recovered successfully.



Citation:
A Stone Age boat building site has been discovered underwater (2019, August 20)
retrieved 20 August 2019
from https://phys.org/news/2019-08-stone-age-boat-site-underwater.html

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Material Handlers Follow in Clients’ Footsteps – businessjournaldaily.com

Material Handlers Follow in Clients’ Footsteps – businessjournaldaily.com

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio – As long as companies in the five-county region are expanding and building, the material-handling businesses that supply them will follow closely behind.

“There’s new buildings, existing ones that people are moving into. And that’s creating opportunities for us,” says Bill Petro, owner of Century-Fournier, Youngstown. “Thank goodness construction is good at this point because with GM Lordstown closing, that wasn’t fun. We used to do a lot of business with lower-tier suppliers to Lordstown that’s gone away now.”

Much of the business of the company is focused on tools for loading docks, such as levellers, seals and trailer restraints, Petro says. Since most equipment sold and serviced by Century-Fournier is for industrial use, it tends to be long-lasting, he continues, so clients aren’t constantly replacing older products.

“We’re supplying durable equipment. It’s not a consumable. It’s equipment and when someone has a crane or dock leveler, they don’t really need us after that unless they’re expanding or something needs to be repaired,” he says. “Business growing in the area does help us.”

For businesses that are growing, investment in material-handling equipment can get pricey, says Carl Stitzel, president of Direct Forklift Co. and DEL Lift Rentals, Boardman. Over the 31-year history of Direct Forklift, he says, there have always been calls about renting equipment. But with increasing demand, DEL was launched as a sister company in 2017.

“In the material-handling world, there’s a large cost factor in your initial investment and you’re speculating how often you’re going to use it,” he says. “If their sales slump or they want to try a new division or line, they don’t have to commit $50,000 to a piece of equipment just on the speculation that it’s going to work out. They can rent it on a monthly basis and if it doesn’t work out, they send it back.”

Most rentals are for scissor lifts, Stitzel notes, though DEL also offers aerial lifts and forklifts. For the latter, some clients rent their entire fleet from DEL, as many as 15 vehicles, he says. In those cases, the company is removing maintenance for the machines from its list of responsibilities, which can help offset rental costs.

“We stock a considerable amount of scissor lifts. It’s probably our most-popular thing being rented. Even though we’ve been in the forklift business 30-some years, scissors are our most popular,” he says. “What we’re seeing from the forklift side of the industry is that side is catching up to what people using scissor lifts have figured out already: that it’s better to rent.”

Rentals also factor into the business of Melmor Associates Inc., Niles, says President Lee Johnson, albeit a small one.

“The nature of what we do doesn’t always lend itself to rentals, but what we have done has been good for us, good for the customer,” he says. “If they have a short-term project, rather than capitalizing and making a big expenditure, they can rent. It’s done well for us.”

Popular among Melmor’s offerings is equipment designed to reduce the strains of labor, such as self-dumping hoppers or lift tables that remove the need for workers to bend over to move products. For clients who see their businesses expanding, vertical storage is useful, Johnson adds.

“Storage racks go up rather than out and your vertical space inside a building is cheaper than adding floor space,” he says.

It’s those kinds of items, that people don’t realize fall into the category of material handling. Oftentimes, customers’ lists don’t get very far beyond the machinery offered.

“Some people see material handling all the time and don’t realize they’re looking at it,” says Century Fornier’s Petro “It could be a conveyor routing packages. It could be a workstation that’s feeding parts to a storage area. It can be storage racks or pallets stacked to the sky.”

In Vienna Township, Litco International Inc. specializes in those very pallets. The company manufactures engineered molded-wood pallets that eliminate the need for nails and staples, says vice president Gary Sharon. By the fourth quarter, he expects the company to complete an expansion to offer products made of extruded wood fiber.

“Compression molding and extrusion molding use the same types of fiber that we currently process,” Sharon says. “The extruding lines will also enable us to make a variety of packaging and nonpackaging products. We are currently seeking prospective customers with needs for products and designs that would lend themselves to be produced on the extruding lines.”

Storage solutions are also a popular line, he continues. With Litco’s products being “nestable,” as Sharon calls them, companies with limited space don’t have to clutter their shop floors with traditional pallets that have to be stacked one on top of the other.

“Customers like them because our pallets take up less than half of the space as solid-wood, slat and nailed-wood pallets,” he says. “This market is growing steadily for Litco because of the design.”

While each company occupies its own space within the material-handling industry, all report that business is doing well. 

Both Direct Forklift and DEL Lift Rentals are “well in the double-digit range” for growth, Stitzel says.

And while the industry as a whole has had its ups and downs over the past 20 years, Melmor’s Johnson says that his business today is going steady.

“It’s been a roller-coaster ride since 9/11 but we’re doing OK,” he says. “Over the last couple of months, the tariffs have affected us a little, but I don’t know that it’s any more than the normal cyclical nature of business.”

And at Litco, with most of its clientele using the Vienna company’s products to handle their own shipping – either domestically or internationally – business is stable as work continues the new manufacturing site.

“Because of the number of customers we have, and the industry mix, our business tends to be relatively stable and predictable,” Sharon says. “As export conditions change, such as exchange rates and tariffs, we see an expansion and contraction in our sales.”

File photo: Direct Forklift co-owners Carl Stitzel and Dave Braun.

Copyright 2019 The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.

Published by The Business Journal, Youngstown, Ohio.

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Introducing the New Nike JOYRIDE Technology

Introducing the New Nike JOYRIDE Technology

Nike unveils its new technology for running: The Nike JOYRIDE. With a thousand of beads in the sole in four capsules, this new creation of the swoosh brand, allows a better recovery and relief of the muscles with each stride, for an effort which can then be more prolonged. The innovation of Nike, allows a better absorption of the impact when the foot is in contact with the ground.

First designed for running athletes, the Nike JOYRIDE technology will be included in the Nike Joyride Run Flyknit and then declined on other models such as the Nike Joyride NSW, the Nike Joyride Setter (which we could discover during the parade Matthew Williams’ P20 ALYX at Paris Fashion Week), the Nike Joyride Optik, designed for women’s paces and the Nike Joyride Nova, designed specifically to meet the needs of young athletes. The Nike Joyride Run Flyknit is for Nike members as of July 25th and will be August 15th around the world.

http://www.fubiz.net/

We were able to interview Kylee Barton, Senior Director of Nike Running Footwear, who tells us a little more about the development and creation of Nike’s latest innovation.

Fubiz : Since how long have you been involved in the design process of this innovation ?

Kylee Barton: I have been involved in the design process since the very beginning, almost 10 years in the making to bring the JOYRIDE to life.

http://www.fubiz.net/

How many phases was the design process of Joyride composed of?

We have done so many iterations of Joyride, tested so many variations. It tooks a year to land on the format what we have now, with 4 cavities built into the running product. We made tons of mistakes with the type of material that we put in the shoes, but it was not mistakes it was more about a learning. We tried a different material : harder and it didn’t work, bigger and it didn’t work neither. We tried filling them really full thinking that more beads is always better because you got more response….Actually it wasn’t, because you need air in the holes of the cavities to be able to compress the beads and provide that spring in the softness. So hundreds of iterations to get to this final place.

Is Flyknit x Joyride the best combo ?

We believe that for this design (the Flyknit), the way it wraps the foot and plays nicely off of the bottom really does provide this upper this unbelievably coussin soft underfoot.


So we do believe that combination together makes a lot of sense for the runner.

http://www.fubiz.net/

What kind of creative iterations of Joyride we can expect ?

We will have a sportswear version and a kids version that will come out. For after running.But running will be the only one that have the 4 cavities. Sportswear will be built differently and kids will be built differently as well and only has 2. Sportswear has 3. So it really important that we have 4 because it’s what provide the true performance under foot experience versus sportswear that is intended to be lifestyle.

http://www.fubiz.net/




Which category in Nike is the most challenging ? How and why running is so different?

Every category has different challenges. I think running is difficult because there is a lot of pressure on the product because we are a running company. I think there are different types of difficulties. If you are in a really small category that maybe doesn’t get as many resources from the brand for innovation, budget to travel, talk to consumer… that point can be difficult because you have less money to work with.


So for categories, I wouldn’t say that one is more difficult than the other, they are just really different.And the comparison from running to football is actually what I love about this. Things are not the same if you are working with the best athletes in the world at very high levels. So the performance of the product that we are building in those categories is industry changing.


But I think one of the nuances is that football is a much smaller business, much smaller revenue, a different approach as a brand versus running that have to spread across so many categories and distribution points…people buy the shoes and they will never run on them.

http://www.fubiz.net/

Why choosing the recovery as the key features ?

I think it did not started out with recovery, it started out with how you make it easier for the runner. As we unraveled that insight you realized that, for the week runner, making it easy meant recovery because they already know how to run. So it didn’t start out as make recovery shoes, it started out as just make something that make things easier for people to run. And then the recovery piece became the short point for all of the athletes to help them to recover quicker to get back in their training.

http://www.fubiz.net/

What is your opinion on the colors and size of Joyride beads ?

We spent a lot of time on color and I feel great about this product because I think it provides this easy wearable colorway with very fun energetic colors. Actually it is both for man and women, which is why we launch with the unisex colors. Knowing the time of launching of the year, we wanted to bring something that felt useful and energetic… Something that when you look at that shoes, you just want to put it on. You’re like “there is something about that” and you just want to put on. We know that color can be one of the most important factor to buy a product and it can be a reason not to buy the shoe. We wanted to do something that is really easy and intuitive.

http://www.fubiz.net/

Did you change the colors and size of Joyride beads during the the design process?

We tried so many different sizes and materials, many variations. They are all the same size now. The material used is thermoplastic elastomers which is a very kind of rubber like material which is what helps provide that spring.

http://www.fubiz.net/

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Flutter App Development – A Revolutionary Step in Mobile SDKs

Flutter App Development – A Revolutionary Step in Mobile SDKs

Google’s latest kid on the mobile app development block is Flutter, an open-source mobile application development framework launched in May 2017. This Google alpha emerged through five previews. The first stable version Flutter 1.0 released in December 2018. Flutter is a Software Development Kit (SDK) that enables developers to write mobile applications for both Android and iOS platforms using a single code and eliminates the dilemma of choosing between apps if on a limited budget.

So, what’s so interesting about it?

Android Studio and Xcode required developers to create two different versions of apps for Android and iOS – one using Java or Kotlin, while the other with Objective-C or Swift. SDK. Flutter is a cross-platform SDK that doesn’t require writing different codes for different apps. Flutter’s complete package of framework, widgets, and tools enables enhanced, efficient, and visually-stunning apps.


Application Development Has Time Saving Features

Dart Programming

Flutter works on Dart programming, which can also be integrated with Java and Swift for Android and iOS, respectively. The integration eliminates the process of rewriting existing applications if developers want to start using Flutter. Compilation of Dart with Java can create web applications. However, it is not compulsory to integrate Dart with Java. It has a broader scope of developing interfaces, collections, etc.

Dart language is built on two main components: Ahead of Time compiler (AOT) and Just in Time ompiler (JIT). AOT support helps in improving startup time and app performance while JIT helps in faster loading of source codes. Additionally, JIT compiles with ARM for 32-bit and 64-bit. To run natively, both Android and Apple platform mobile apps are written in Dart.

Hot Reload

Hot Reload is an exciting feature that is capable of administering updated code into an already running machine. Mobile app testing requires introducing updated source codes to find out which code works the best. Earlier tools like Android Studio take a lot of time to inject new code while the application is running. Hot Reload can save precious amount of time, enabling the developers to see their changes within a second. Also, developers can recreate the desired effects without changing the state of an application. “Stateful Hot Reload” feature helps in tweaking the apps on a real-time basis. Apart from that, there is no need to enter login details while entering new code. Google has also claimed that such a feature has increased the productivity of development cycle three times.

Skia 2D

Flutter works on Skia 2D graphics engine that enables rendering of the graphics without any glitches. Plus, Flutter runs according to the device’s native speed. Apart from building amazing apps, you can control every pixel in front of you with its brilliant composition. It allows you to build graphic animation, control over video, text, etc.

What’s New in the Stable Channel Flutter 1.0

Flutter 1.0 is the first stable channel, which means it has minor updates compared to its master, beta, or dev channels. Since the launch of the first version, around 20 distinct Firebase support services are added. Flutter apps have also seen a reduction in their sizes. Flutter 1.0 integrates with Dart 2.1. Dart 2.1 works in comparatively smaller codes. It also has improved type checks, errors, and new enhancements for enhancing user experiences.

Add to App

Add to App is a feature helpful for flutter app developers who are unable to build a new app altogether. It makes the sharing of assets between the original source code and Flutter. Moreover, it is now feasible to attach a Flutter process that already exists without launching debugger.

Platform Views

Platform Views enables an embedded control in a Flutter app with widgets like UiKitView and AndroidView. UiKitView and AndroidView are built with a composition model. The host content can be easily integrated with Flutter (and other) content with the help of these widgets. Flutter doesn’t rely on web view or even OEM widgets. It has its own rendering engine that renders each viewable component effortlessly. Also, there are immense improvements in Material Design (Android), and Cupertino (iOS) widget sets to enhance the user interface. (UI).

Rendering engines have the power and ability to produce applications with a performance which blends with the native device. So, C/C + + code blends with NDK and LLVM on Android and iOS, respectively. The widgets render the visuals to Skia canvas and send them to the platform. Flutter works on a shell specifically designed for the concerned platform that hosts Dart Virtual Machine inside it. It allows easy access to program interfaces (APIs) and a proper flow of interaction between the shell and relevant inputs (IMEs).

Framework

Cross-platform frameworks require a direct flow of communication between native services. Hybrid applications are based on Webviews, which are simply browsers embedded in an application to render HTML.

Earlier frameworks like Cordova, Apache, PhoneGap were based on either Java Script or Webviews. However, the communication between Javascript and native services of devices was a little awkward. It required building a bridge to switch contexts between both realms. Flutter development came up with an advanced solution eliminating the use of that “bridge.” Dart’s AOT is a compiled programming language that enables easier communication to the native services. AOT compilers help with improved performance and faster startups.

Winding Up

Flutter is a revolutionary step in the future of app development. It is the only mobile software development kit providing reactive views without creating a bridge between Java and native code.  There are many application development solutions and other mobile app development services for all your application needs. Mobile app developers need to check this out to deliver scintillating apps in less time with a single code base for both Android and iOS apps.

Ashwin Vairu

I am the Executive Director – Marketing of 9series Solutions Pvt. Ltd. As an engineer and entrepreneur, I assist start-ups, individuals, SMEs and enterprise businesses in their end to end technology needs. I am a strong believer in “Those who are active are young”. I love to write about the developments in technologies and how it will affect the growth of any organization.

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Architect’s Living in a Watermill / DEBYT

Architect’s Living in a Watermill / DEBYT

Architect’s Living in a Watermill / DEBYT

Architect’s Living in a Watermill / DEBYT, © Václav Novák

© Václav Novák


© Václav Novák


© Václav Novák


© Václav Novák


© Václav Novák






+ 32



  • Architects

  • Location

    Ostrovec-Lhotka, Czech Republic

  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Tomáš Petrášek

  • Design Team

    Tomáš Petrášek

  • Area

    96.7 m2

  • Project Year

    2019

  • Photographs

  • Manufacturers

    Loading…


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

Text description provided by the architects. The starting point for his own living of the architect was a partially renovated watermill building, a former paper factory, found in the preserve in Křivoklátsko – part of western Bohemia (Czech Republic/Europe), in the valley of Zbiroh stream. The opportunity to habitat the smaller part of the building was only viable under the condition that the outer character would respect the earlier renovation. 


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

The mill room itself essentially functions as a “two-in-one” house. The inner vertical dividing wall, which up until the addition in the 1940s was in fact the gable wall, separates the new living unit from the older one, which houses the architect’s wife’s parents. The units are for practical reasons interconnected via souterrain and on the second floor, without compromising privacy.


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák


First floor plan - New

First floor plan – New


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

From the beginning, the main intent was to follow through with the industrial character of the building, mainly by preserving the large open spaces with original timber beam constructions on each floor. The individual floors fulfil the function of a children’s room with a dressing room and a bathroom on the slightly elevated ground floor, a living room with a kitchen on the first floor and a bedroom, a study and a bathroom in the attic.


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

The space designated for renovation is more reminiscent of a tower than a house. Given such prominent vertical arrangement of the space, the skylight-lit staircase serves as the main integrating tool.


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

The mentioned staircase is situated at the northern façade, and is, in the upward direction, increasingly brighter and increasingly more connected to the individual floors. On the ground floor, the staircase is completely separated from all living spaces by thick walls, on the next floor it is more interconnected thanks to a glass partition and on the last floor, the staircase naturally merges into the attic study which looks like an open deck. The motive of the design is a journey towards the skylight, as well as maximising the inhabitation possibilities of the staircase.


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

Exterior modifications are focused mainly at the eastern gable façade, which has been prominently modified. Large windows have been added, as well as a terrace at the same level the kitchen is situated. The terrace is accessible by an interconnecting bridge and offers enchanting views of a small rockery and the open valley of the Zbiroh stream. The erection of the terrace has also enabled the roofing of the entrance area, which serves as the traditional “doorstep” space.


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák


Section

Section


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

The design has preserved the industrial and at the same time rural character of the exterior as well as the interior. Material-wise, mainly wood, metal, stucco plastering and cement coating have been used. The building has been treated with regards to ecology and with the effort of maximal utilisation of all that already existed. All wood as well as timber beams from the original structure, as well as all other gathered timber that has accumulated over the years in the settlement have been used not only as construction members but also in the interior.


© Václav Novák

© Václav Novák

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Cite: “Architect’s Living in a Watermill / DEBYT” 10 Aug 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed .

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An intriguing new habitat project “inspired” by NASA

An intriguing new habitat project “inspired” by NASA

The AI SpaceFactory team won half a million dollars from NASA for its Mars habitat prototype, MARSHA. They are now taking the research, learnings, and technologies they developed for their winning proposal and building an earth habitat (house) using the same concepts.

TERA interjects into the building industry’s massive waste of materials and creates a proof-of-concept for a new type of building – one that is durable and twice as strong as concrete, yet recyclable and compostable.

TERA habitat

Considering how polluting the manufacturing of concrete is, their material certainly sounds interesting:

Biopolymer basalt composite -a material developed from crops like corn and sugar cane – tested and validated by NASA to be (at minimum) 50% stronger and more durable than concrete. This material has the potential to be leaps and bounds more sustainable than traditional concrete and steel, leading to a future in which we can eliminate the building industry’s massive waste of unrecyclable materials. It could transform the way we build on Earth – and save our planet.

In many countries, the production of ethanol with corn is creating problems with the provenance and availability of that grain to feed livestock and humans. I would love to know more about how the use here differs.

Since this is a prototype which they will make available for leasing by the night, they will also be using it as a lab to evolve the concept:

TERA is a living laboratory where feedback and operational data will be used to improve future designs for our future Earth and Space habitats. Each TERA will build on the last until we achieve highly autonomous structurally performing human-rated habitats.

TERA habitat

The link at top is to the firm’s project page but they are also running an Indiegogo and that page has lots more details and pictures.




If you are intrigued by the impact of concrete and cement, and why we don’t yet have widely commercially available real alternatives, Rose Eveleth did a fantastic episode of her Flash Forward podcast on that topic: EARTH: The Cement Ban.

More about…

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NEW GUIDE: Best Beginner Microcontroller Boards for Teachers #AdafruitLearningSystem #Adafruit #Education #Making #BackToSchool @Adafruit @KathyCeceri

NEW GUIDE: Best Beginner Microcontroller Boards for Teachers #AdafruitLearningSystem #Adafruit #Education #Making #BackToSchool @Adafruit @KathyCeceri

Best Beginner Boards for Teachers

A new guide in the Adafruit Learning System today: Best Beginner Boards for Teachers by Kathy Ceceri

Microcontrollers a great way to introduce kids to coding and building. Just add a few components and everyday crafts or recycled material and you can build everything from a simple circuit to a fully-functional robot!

Luckily, getting students started with microcontrollers is easier than ever before! Here’s a look at three boards — the Circuit Playground Express, the Gemma M0, and the PyBadge — that are great for teachers who are ready to learn coding and electronics themselves, and/or working with students who have little or no coding background.

See this new guide now > > >

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Stop breadboarding and soldering – start making immediately! Adafruit’s Circuit Playground is jam-packed with LEDs, sensors, buttons, alligator clip pads and more. Build projects with Circuit Playground in a few minutes with the drag-and-drop MakeCode programming site, learn computer science using the CS Discoveries class on code.org, jump into CircuitPython to learn Python and hardware together, or even use Arduino IDE. Circuit Playground Express is the newest and best Circuit Playground board, with support for MakeCode, CircuitPython, and Arduino. It has a powerful processor, 10 NeoPixels, mini speaker, InfraRed receive and transmit, two buttons, a switch, 14 alligator clip pads, and lots of sensors: capacitive touch, IR proximity, temperature, light, motion and sound. A whole wide world of electronics and coding is waiting for you, and it fits in the palm of your hand.

Join 12,000+ makers on Adafruit’s Discord channels and be part of the community! http://adafru.it/discord

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Have an amazing project to share? The Electronics Show and Tell with Google Hangouts On-Air is every Wednesday at 7:30pm ET! To join, head over to YouTube and check out the show’s live chat – we’ll post the link there.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

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U9 Apartments / Nicolás Vázquez

U9 Apartments / Nicolás Vázquez

U9 Apartments / Nicolás Vázquez

U9 Apartments / Nicolás Vázquez, © Moritz Bernoully

© Moritz Bernoully

  • Architects

  • Location

    Mixcoac, Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico

  • Category

  • Design Team

    Emilio Rubio, Elizabeth León, Andrés Solíz, Luis Villanueva

  • Area

    2452.0 m2

  • Project Year

    2018

  • Photography

    Moritz Bernoully, Dante Busquets, Mauricio Salas, Paulino Ramírez

  • Manufacturers

    Loading…

  • Clients

    Rodrigo de la Garza

  • Engineering

    Enrique Ávalos, Jose Antonio Lino

  • Construction

    Métrico Arquitectos 

  • Manufacturers

    Loading…


© Moritz Bernoully

© Moritz Bernoully

Text description provided by the architects. Divided into three basic typologies, the building contains fifteen apartments between approximately 60 and 120 square meters. The apartments are ordered successively following the structural module that gives rhythm to the building. This system also gives total privacy to the living spaces. Within this structure – which is separated from the medians – three levels of housing and parking are allowed.


© Moritz Bernoully

© Moritz Bernoully


Floor Plan Level Two

Floor Plan Level Two


© Moritz Bernoully

© Moritz Bernoully

On the first two floors, two-level units are arranged (with some double-height spaces) and the single-floor apartments are located on the third level. Towards the street, four apartments share the main facade defined by four balconies that take advantage of the life and view of the street. This street – a closed small-scale street with low traffic – is located in a neighbourhood in Mixcoac with its intricate and compact urban fabric, which is clearly perceived to this date.


© Dante Busquets, Mauricio Salas, Paulino Ramírez

© Dante Busquets, Mauricio Salas, Paulino Ramírez


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© Dante Busquets, Mauricio Salas, Paulino Ramírez

© Dante Busquets, Mauricio Salas, Paulino Ramírez

The project and its predecessors (we built two other buildings on the same street before) seek to emphasize a type of urban unity. From the material expression of each building, we aim to highlight the repeated use of bricks historically produced in the area. In this way, the new building establishes a resonance with the place and with the previous projects.


© Moritz Bernoully

© Moritz Bernoully

Built by means of a punctual structure of rigid frames, posters and concrete segments, the building-bay is oriented to the south. We also combine partition walls to play with the scale, proportions and neighboring buildings. We use lattices and vegetation that filter the views towards the boundaries but allow the passage of air. It is through transitional spaces, succession of empty-masses and through compact, but diverse, volumes that the three buildings respond to the scale and vocation of the street: we seek to “make city” from the habitable unit.


© Dante Busquets, Mauricio Salas, Paulino Ramírez

© Dante Busquets, Mauricio Salas, Paulino Ramírez

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Project location

Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.

Cite: “U9 Apartments / Nicolás Vázquez” [Departamentos U9 / Nicolás Vázquez] 14 Aug 2019. ArchDaily. (Trans. Johansson, Emma) Accessed .

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The Morning Watch: Building a Working ‘Fifth Element’ Gun, ‘The Lion King’ Scene Breakdown & More

The Morning Watch: Building a Working ‘Fifth Element’ Gun, ‘The Lion King’ Scene Breakdown & More

Working Fifth Element Gun

The Morning Watch is a recurring feature that highlights a handful of noteworthy videos from around the web. They could be video essays, fanmade productions, featurettes, short films, hilarious sketches, or just anything that has to do with our favorite movies and TV shows.

In this edition, watch as Adam Savage reveals his build of a fully functional version of Zorg’s gun from The Fifth Element. Plus, pay attention as Jon Favreau breaks down what went into a scene in Disney’s remake of The Lion King, and The Today Show has an extensive chat with Quentin Tarantino and the cast of his new movie Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.

First up, after building a prop replica of the multi-functional weapon sold by Zorg Industries from The Fifth Element, master builder Adam Savage created a real, working version of the weapon that does everything shown in the movie. You’ll see exactly what kind of changes had to be made in order to accommodate all the artillery inside, which makes the gun weigh 40 pounds.

Next, in this scene breakdown for The Lion King at Vanity Fair, director Jon Favreau talks about how they determined what moments from the first movie they needed to hit hard and accurately for those who remember the movie very well. But they also talk about the scenes that they knew allowed them a little more freedom because they aren’t ingrained in the audience’s memory.

Finally, watch a 22-minute interview with director Quentin Tarantino and his Once Upon a Time in Hollywood cast members Margot Robbie, Leonardo DiCaprio and Brad Pitt. The stars discuss their relationship with the material, working with a director like Tarantino, and much more.

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Studio Visit: Artist Refik Anadol

Studio Visit: Artist Refik Anadol

Refik Anadol is in the future—not from the future or thinking about it, but working within a space that many have yet to approach. The Turkey-born, LA-based artist creates immersive works that use light to explore architecture. He employs developing technologies and complex algorithms to create what he feels are an interactive evolution of film. Take “WDCH Dreams,” a 2018 work that uses the exterior of Downtown LA’s Frank Gehry-designed Walt Disney Concert Hall as a canvas for projecting the building’s “dreams” onto. These are colorful visuals created by Anadol and his team through machine learning algorithms that make use of the LA Phil’s 45-terabyte archive. Works like this speak to the Anadol’s approach and interests, these giant projects that employ technology to do the seemingly impossible.

by Kyle Raymond Fitzpatrick

As Anadol and team prepare for the opening of Machine Hallucination, a new mixed-reality piece at New York’s Artechouse (opening 6 September), we visit the artist’s studio to learn about his approach and the obstacles that pop up when working with tech that very few in the world have access to.

by Kyle Raymond Fitzpatrick

Tell us a little about your workspace.

We’re in an early 1960s warehouse in Frogtown, next to the LA River. It was used until the late ’90s and, in the early 2000s, there was a quick push to make this a lively new environment. That didn’t work. So, we took over almost seven months ago and renovated because, as a studio, we’re using complex hardwares, softwares, always looking for experiential negative space where we can explore light as a material. It’s a perfect place.

by Kyle Raymond Fitzpatrick

How did you get to this point?

I started using light as a material almost 10 years ago. I’ve been using architecture as a canvas, light as a material, data as a material, but having a studio has been a dream. Being alone is limiting because you have bigger dreams than your capacity. I was heavily inspired by cinema as a medium— which is an exciting medium because you can make a reality that people can become a part of. It’s very existential.

What we do is not just focused on art but is something that is universal, for everyone

After my studies at UCLA, things went very well. The idea of opening a studio applied to my thesis project. Now? We are 12 people, wonderful minds collaborating every single day. Plus me and people around the world using custom software development, complex computations, and our collaboration with tech giants like Microsoft and Google—these all collide at this place in Frogtown.

What we do is not just focused art but is something that is universal, for everyone. The idea is to reach anyone of any age of any background. That’s the dream: to make something that really changes the world, which has to be bigger, to hug everyone.

Courtesy of Refik Anadol

What can you tell us about your upcoming project, Mission Hallucination?

Three years ago, Google’s Artists and Mission Intelligence group was looking for artists who need help to use AI. This was a very beautiful problem because we have been using data as completely as possible. We were into algorithms, into complex computations, but using AI is not something that you can do easily. It’s not something as simple. But, three years ago, this collaboration allowed me and the entire team to learn how to use AI. That was a turning point. We did our first project which was the world’s first AI installation using public data for a public space called Archive Dreaming. Then we did Melting Memories, focused on remembering our most precious moments and emotions, which is going to the Pompidou. The third one, which is the WDCH Dreams is about architecture and if architecture can dream and learn. Can it remember? Giving cognitive capacity to a building, basically. But Mission Hallucination is a kind of an endpoint, our peak level. This time it’s about the cities.

The last several years, I’ve been very inspired by cities themselves and how we use them as living entities. Memory concepts, after technology, have completely changed. Social networks and machines (like iPhones) are our new memory recorders, they’re in the Cloud and checked by billions of people. It’s a very interesting concept. This has never happened in humanity’s history. What we are trying to do is ask: can we use Mission Intelligence, which is AI, to reconstruct memories and create a story—a narrative of what has been leftover? To make this happen, we’ve downloaded more than a 100 million images of New York. There are some records, of course, but we’re not Google, we’re not Intel; we’re a group of artists. This is an artistic approach, with this large dataset to “hallucinate” New York. What if we let the machine dream?

The experience uses 18 channel projections and sound to create an epic audio/visual installation that reinvents the cinema, basically. It’s a big topic but I think we are doing it. That’s the stress level in the studio!

by Kyle Raymond Fitzpatrick

What are your philosophies on light and space? How do you approach this in your work?

Artists like Dan Flavin, Robert Irwin and James Turrell are my heroes. But what would happen if they had the same body of work and philosophy, but with today’s tools? They’re thinking of light as a material but they were also a part of their technology. They were clearly thinking about light in an environment, which is very fundamental thinking. Yet it’s not just light itself that’s inspirational: I’m also thinking about the future of architecture. Why are walls empty? How can we bring a cognitive capacity? What would happen if this building remembers? What if it has dream processes?

Light is a divine material that is as existential as water

Light and space is doing that. Light and space connects. But data was missing in that. Light is the best material in the world, that can project imagination into a built environment because, clearly, concrete, glass, and steel are biased materials because of gravity. Light? It can travel infinitely if there is no barrier. Light is a divine material that is as existential as water. All these purposeful reasons make it very easy for me to focus on this material.

by Kyle Raymond Fitzpatrick

Your work has gotten more textural and tactile. How is texture data?

In 2009, I was researching on the topic of computational graphics. Ken Perlin, a professor at NYU, created a fantastic algorithm called Perlin Noise. It’s a 46-line of code that has gotten an Oscar award. The reason is interesting: with this code, you can visually create landscapes, sky, clouds and even ocean. It’s an algorithm that can create kind-of-reality. I was fascinated with that. Again, the cinema is one of my greatest inspirations: if this algorithm is used for that, what else can we use for this algorithm?

The texture is coming from this algorithm. But to go deeper, we dive into the computational design process to develop our own library, our own softwares, where we can take data from wind, from human memory, from body motion, from a breath, from water, and apply this invisible pattern of data into an invisible layer of noise algorithm. It was a very fresh approach, I think, that pioneered something in this field. I even coined a term called “data painting,” where you really give a pigment a life, to move in a dynamic context.

The second inspiring algorithm is fluid simulations. I was heavily inspired by water. That’s my second favorite material in texture. We heavily research fluid algorithms where you can simulate water.

by Kyle Raymond Fitzpatrick

What are the challenges in your work?

It’s a very multi-layer process. You have a layer of hardware and a layer of software, which is where complications lie. We’re on the edge of complications. We’re not doing things that anyone can do. We’re working with tech giants, standing on the shoulders of the people inventing the future. We are using tools from the near-future for now. To solve these problems, we have to use tools from now, materials from now, dialogues from now to invent near-future experiences. This is a time machine problem: you go somewhere, come back and—shit—the time is too far behind.

That’s one thing. Second, the ideas can’t be too fresh. When ideas are too fresh, it cannot be used immediately. It needs to be digested, sit for a while, to really understand what it can mean. Why use this algorithm? Why that canvas? These technical questions are the real problems. Sometimes we are quick, sometimes we are slow. We don’t want to make a gimmicky experience.

The true challenge, the most intimate challenge for me, is once we are in the public realm, that means a specific experience will be touched by people and it may touch their soul, their mind, their memories. This is a very big responsibility. That’s one of the reasons I take my time. Every pixel needs to be done with this same purpose to make sure that these aren’t cold ideas. These are intimate responsibilities beyond algorithms, beyond machines. It’s very human. This is my inner, biggest challenge.

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